Posted by | February 20, 2017 10:28 | Filed under: News Behaving Badly Politics

A portrait of the seventh president of the United States now hangs in the Oval Office. He was erratic, viciously bigoted, and genocidal. So it is no surprise that Donald Trump and his team love the guy.

An unvarnished celebrity outsider who pledged to represent the forgotten laborer took on an intellectual member of the Washington establishment looking to extend a political dynasty in the White House.

Andrew Jackson’s triumph in 1828 over President John Quincy Adams bears striking similarities to Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton last year, and some of those most eager to point that out are in the Trump White House.

Trump’s team has seized upon the parallels between the current president and the long-dead Tennessee war hero. Trump has hung a portrait of Jackson in the Oval Office and Trump’s chief strategist, Stephen Bannon, who has pushed the comparison, told reporters after Trump’s inaugural address that “I don’t think we’ve had a speech like that since Andrew Jackson came to the White House.”

Trump himself mused during his first days in Washington that “there hasn’t been anything like this since Andrew Jackson.”

It’s a remarkable moment of rehabilitation for a figure whose populist credentials and anti-establishment streak has been tempered by harsher elements of his legacy, chiefly his forced removal of Native Americans that caused disease and the death of thousands. …

The seventh president, known as “Old Hickory” for his toughness on the battlefield, gained fame when he led American forces to a victory in the Battle of New Orleans in the final throes of the War of 1812. He did serve a term representing Tennessee in the Senate, but he has long been imagined as a rough and tumble American folk hero, an anti-intellectual who believed in settling scores against political opponents and even killed a man in a duel for insulting the honor of Jackson’s wife.

Jackson also raged against what he deemed “a corrupt bargain” that prevented him from winning the 1824 election against Adams when the race was thrown to the House of Representatives after no candidate received a majority in the Electoral College. Even before the vote in November, Trump railed against a “rigged” election and has repeatedly asserted, without evidence, widespread voter fraud prevented his own popular vote triumph.

Jackson’s ascension came at a time when the right to vote was expanded to all white men — and not just property-owners — and he fashioned himself into a populist, bringing new groups of voters into the electoral system. Remarkably, the popular vote tripled between Jackson’s loss in 1824 and his victory four years later, and he used the nation’s growing newspaper industry — like Trump on social media — to spread his message. …

[T]here are… limits to the comparison [between Jackson and Trump], historians say.

Unlike Jackson, who won in 1828 in a landslide, Trump lost the popular vote by nearly 3 million ballots. Jon Meacham, who wrote a 2008 biography of Jackson, “American Lion,” said Jackson was “an outsider in style but not in substance” and his outlandish public pronouncements would often be followed by hours of deep conversations and letter-writing hashing out political calculations.

“He was a wild man during the day but a careful diplomat at night,” said Meacham, who said it was too early to know whether Trump, like Jackson, “had a strategy behind his theatrics,” and whether Trump had the ability to harness the wave of populism that has swept the globe as it did in the 1820s.

“The moment is Jacksoninan but do we have a Jackson in the Oval Office?” Meacham asked.

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Copyright 2017 Liberaland
By: dave-dr-gonzo

Dave "Doctor" Gonzo is a renegade record producer, writer, reformed corporate shill, and still-registered lobbyist for non-one-percenter performing artists and musicians. He lives in a heavily fortified compound in one of Manhattan's less trendy neighborhoods.

  • Suzanne McFly

    Who believes rump knows anything about Jackson other than the ethnic cleansing he caused with his Trail of Tears which resulted in thousands of deaths of indigenous people.

    • granpa.usthai

      about the only reason I can think of for LIAR trump to have POTUS Jackson’s portrait in the oval office.

      • Suzanne McFly

        Yup, me too.

  • mea_mark

    ” … his outlandish public pronouncements would often be followed by hours of deep conversations and letter-writing hashing out political calculations. ” — tRump – hours of praising self followed by shallow tweets of misconstrued lies and deflections. I see a similarity there, sure, why not. s

  • Glen

    I’m not particularly knowledgeable in American history (being an Australian), so I just assumed that the fetish had something to do with crackpots and a big block of cheese…

    • granpa.usthai

      it’s LIAR trump’s team searching for a thread they can hang on to; especially in the upcoming light of their traitorous acts against America with the russian halfpint ruler.

      Hell, they ain’t even the same color. POTUS Jackson was WHITE.
      LIAR trump is urine orange.

      big difference.

    • Larry Schmitt

      You have a lot in common with a majority of Americans, unfortunately. Surveys pop up periodically, and an astounding percentage of them can’t identify their own state on a map. Most Americans can’t name any of their Congressmen. And some of them even vote.

  • granpa.usthai

    LIAR trump is no POTUS Jackson.

    POTUS Jackson was no coward.
    LIAR trump IS a COWARD.

    makes All the difference in the world.

  • robert

    Make Sweden great again

    I don’t think Andrew Jackson gave a rat’s ass what was going on in sweden

    • Larry Schmitt

      Neither does trump.

      • amersham1046

        Trump thinks Sweden’s largest export is meatballs

  • bpollen

    How about his similarity to La Toya Jackson?